Server issues – Segfaults

Recently the BCA server has been experiencing random reboots and lock-ups.
Looking at the logs it appears the system is experiencing segmentation faults. May be the memory, but that was recently replaced.

I am leaning towards processor issues. The CPU may have run hot for a while and had some sort of internal failure or weakening.

I will be looking to build up a new server, but in the mean time I have a spare motherboard, processor, and RAM on standby. If I don’t find some new hardware to get my ceph cluster running soon I will at least swap out the hardware to make the system more stable.

Check back for updates as things progress.

Don’t cheap out on your automotive repairs

Recently I had noticed some wobbling while driving, and upon inspection it turns out the wobble was being caused by a bad wheel bearing.

I bought a replacement on special order from PartSource. The part was a Mevotech IWE for $165.
After installing and going for a test drive everything was fine, but after 2 days the bearing started to pop when steering. I checked the wheel for play, and sure enough you could move it horizontally and vertically with little effort.

I needed a replacement and there were no Mevotech’s at any of the PartSource locations around me, so I purchased a MOOG for $300. They assured me I could return the Mevotech to the original purchase location to get my money back.
When I brought the failed bearing back to the original location I had purchased it from, they told me they can’t do a return on the part since it was a special order. I could only get a warrantly replacement of the same type of part.

So now I’m out $165 and have another wheel bearing that would probably fail if installed. I should have just purchased the MOOG in the first place. Lessons learned.

I have been Pwned!

So, thanks to the awesome website https://haveibeenpwned.com I found out that my e-mail address has been involved in two data breaches in recent years. Both were services I no longer use, so I didn’t think I had reason to care.

Today I received a lovely e-mail stating that there was a successful login to my Twitter account from the Netherlands. Which wouldn’t be surprising, if I was in the Netherlands rather than Canada. Within 15 minutes of the e-mail from Twitter, Facebook sent me a security code for new device login. I clicked the “report suspicious activity” link in the e-mail. I proceeded to change my password on all of my social media sites.

Has laziness really become more important than security for me? In a word, YES!

Time to fix the problem. I have started using KeePass2 on mobile and desktop (via USB). I sync the two via SCP on-demand. I will automate the sync at a later time when I am comfortable with the software.

Now starts the long and painful journey of remembering every site I have an account on, and replacing my password with something I don’t even know.

 

Don’t become a victim of online identity theft. Make sure you don’t re-use passwords ANYWHERE.
Make sure your e-mail account is secure. If someone gets into your e-mail account, they can simply reset your password for all of the sites associated with that address.
Don’t use easy to guess or brute force passwords. My goto for low priority accounts was probably cracked within 5 minutes according to some online research.
Lastly, as I see security advocates saying constantly, USE A PASSWORD MANAGER!

It’s a dangerous world out there on the internet. Be safe, not a statistic like me.

 

Database Issues on bommer.ca servers

So I’ve been noticing some database issues as well as high bandwidth usage.
Checking my server logs I found a few billion hits to xmlrpc.php on my WordPress sites.

Not only the number of hits, but the fact that the hits were leaving connections in my SQL server in SLEEP caused the database to become unresponsive.

I took some steps to mitigate the issue, and everything has been running smooth for 3 days.

This post will serve as a reminder to keep an eye on the number of active processes in SQL, as well as to keep an eye on the server logs a little closer.

glass-984457_960_720

Windows 10 keeps updating my sound card to the wrong driver

I finally cracked this one. Here’s what I did to stop Windows 10 from updating my audio driver from Sound Blaster Z to Recon3d.

First, you will need to get the Windows Update Powershell Module from Technet. It can be located here:
https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/2d191bcd-3308-4edd-9de2-88dff796b0bc

Once the ZIP file is downloaded, extract it to one of the following locations:

For only your user:

  • %USERPROFILE%\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Modules

For any user on the machine:

  • %WINDIR%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\Modules

Next, run Powershell as Administrator (Click start, type Powershell, right click Windows PowerShell and click Run As Administrator”

In Powershell, you will need to allow script execution.
Type:

Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted

Press enter, then type:

Import-Module PSWindowsUpdate

And press enter.

Now, remove the updated driver. I was able to do this through Device Manager, and using the Roll back driver button on my audio device.

Once the driver has been rolled back, in Powershell, type:

Get-WUList

Press enter, you will get a list of possible driver updates like this:

ComputerName Status KB          Size Title
------------ ------ --          ---- -----
GAMERIG      ------             2 MB Creative - Audio Device - SB Recon3D PCIe Audio Controller
GAMERIG      ------            47 KB Intel - Other hardware - Intel(R) 100 Series/C230 Series Chipset Family Thermal subsystem - A131
GAMERIG      ------             3 MB Intel - Other hardware - Intel(R) Watchdog Timer Driver (Intel(R) WDT)

Note the “Creative – Audio Device – SB Recon3D PCIe Audio Controller” entry in the list. This is the driver Windows Update keeps installing and breaking my audio support.
In my case, this will be the driver I will be disabling. You can use the following commands, replacing the offending driver with the one you are having issues with.

Type:

hide-wuupdate -Title "Creative - Audio Device - SB Recon3D PCIe Audio Controller"

Powershell will ask you to confirm:

Confirm
Are you sure you want to perform this action?
Performing the operation "Hide Creative - Audio Device - SB Recon3D PCIe Audio Controller?" on target "GAMERIG".
[Y] Yes  [A] Yes to All  [N] No  [L] No to All  [S] Suspend  [?] Help (default is "Y"):

Press “Y” and Enter to confirm.

Powershell will show you the following output:

ComputerName Status KB          Size Title
------------ ------ --          ---- -----
GAMERIG      ---H--             2 MB Creative - Audio Device - SB Recon3D PCIe Audio Controller

The “—H–” means the update is now hidden from Windows Update.

You can double check with:

PS C:\WINDOWS\system32> Get-WUList

The output will confirm the update is hidden.

ComputerName Status KB          Size Title
------------ ------ --          ---- -----
GAMERIG      ---H--             2 MB Creative - Audio Device - SB Recon3D PCIe Audio Controller
GAMERIG      ------            47 KB Intel - Other hardware - Intel(R) 100 Series/C230 Series Chipset Family Thermal subsystem - A131
GAMERIG      ------             3 MB Intel - Other hardware - Intel(R) Watchdog Timer Driver (Intel(R) WDT)

 

Enjoy! Your driver will no longer be overwritten by Windows Update.